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Friday, July 8, 2016

Thoughts on the HIT100

If you've been following Health IT for any length of time on Twitter, you are probably familiar with the now annual HIT100 "competition".  I've done pretty well over the years in being recognized by my fellow tweeters.  In 2011 I came in second, tenth in 2012 and 2013.  In 2014 I never saw the official results, but unofficially I was somewhere in 42nd to 44th place.  In 2015, the HIT99 was announced, and I showed up in 22nd place.  This year I'm probably in the top 50, but haven't really paid much attention to it, except for the nominations in my stream.

I liked the HIT100 when it first came out, because it truly did introduce me to new faces in Health IT. Over the years, it's become less relevant, somewhat steeped in contention between competing parties, and clearly more of a popularity contest at the top levels.  BUT, it's still a good list of people to pay attention to.

What it has stopped being is a place where I can identify interesting people to watch that I'm not already paying attention to.  I know most of the people on these lists.

Michael Planchart (@theEHRGuy) has done us all a great service in starting the HIT100, and regardless of what I've heard about motivations, I also thank John Lynn (@techguy) for ensuring that something like it continued in 2015.  And, I'm glad Michael's back in the saddle for 2016.  I'm staying out of the middle of any debate as to the virtues of vices associated with the 2014 and 2015 contests.

I look forward to seeing the results.  I know some of who has been trolling for nominations, and like I've previously said, the standings at the top ten don't matter much to me.  I hope the event continues, and with less angst than in prior years.

But I'd also like to see a new event celebrating people we wouldn't otherwise hear about or notice, perhaps because they have something valuable to say, but don't know how to say it so that we can all hear it, or perhaps because they are new in the field and we just haven't noticed them yet.  I'm not going to start it (at least any time soon), and would love to see someone take this idea up and run with it.

     Keith

P.S. For all of you who nominated me this year, I am extremely grateful.  There's been some lovely GIFs in those nominations which I share below, along with some truly satisfying feedback.  I'm trying to get back into blogging (its been months since I posted two days in a row!) as I finish up my degree, and get steady in my new role(s).



2 comments:

  1. Good analysis of the event. That's why this year I'm planning to post two lists like I did last year: first time nominations and accounts with only one nomination. Like you, I enjoy discovering new people that I wouldn't have known about previously. That's why I like those 2 lists better than the top 100.

    I will say that I also love the gratitude that's exchanged in the nomination process. That part is good regardless of where people land on the list. It's always nice to feel appreciated and to show appreciation to people who've impacted your life. I hope that continues and becomes more than an annual event!

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  2. Glad you enjoyed the silo GIF and have to credit Regina Holliday for pointing out you enjoy "silo busting". As a care coordinator I have strong interest in getting systems that should be talking to each other more (namely mental health and physical health). As a result of #HIT100, I will make it a point to stop by your twitter feed for more "silo-busting" resources :).

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